Tom Wolfe, apostle of 'New Journalism,' dies at 88


Thomas Kennerly Wolfe Jr. (March 2, 1930 – May 14, 2018) was an American author and journalist widely known for his association with New Journalism, a style of news writing and journalism developed in the 1960s and 1970s that incorporated literary techniques. Wolfe began his career as a regional newspaper reporter in the 1950s, achieving national prominence in the 1960s following the publication of such best-selling books as The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (a highly experimental account of Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters) and two collections of articles and essays, Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers and The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby. In 1979, he published the influential book The Right Stuff about the Mercury Seven astronauts, which was made into a 1983 film of the same name directed by Philip Kaufman. WIKIPEDIA

Radio...My Love, My Passion Hardcover – March 20, 2018 by Marlin R. Taylor (Author)

Marlin R. Taylor first discovered musical recordings when he was elementary school-age, when they came from phonograph records that played at 78 revolutions-per-minute. This was just the prelude to his love affair with radio, which began at the end of World War Two, which he received his very own AM-only radio. This was the beginning of his "education" in the industry. Taylor spread beautiful music around the USA in the mid 20th century via syndication to independent radio stations. Taylor is best remembered as the “father” of the instrumentally-based 24/7 stereo-radio format that became known as “Beautiful Music" which started WDVR 101 FM in Philadelphia.

“I find myself thinking deeply about what it means to love America, as I surely do.” —Dan Rather

At a moment of crisis over our national identity, venerated journalist Dan Rather has emerged as a voice of reason and integrity, reflecting on—and writing passionately about—what it means to be an American. Now, with this collection of original essays, he reminds us of the principles upon which the United States was founded. Looking at the freedoms that define us, from the vote to the press; the values that have transformed us, from empathy to inclusion to service; the institutions that sustain us, such as public education; and the traits that helped form our young country, such as the audacity to take on daunting challenges in science and medicine, Rather brings to bear his decades of experience on the frontlines of the world’s biggest stories. As a living witness to historical change, he offers up an intimate view of history, tracing where we have been in order to help us chart a way forward and heal our bitter divisions. With a fundamental sense of hope, What Unites Us is the book to inspire conversation and listening, and to remind us all how we are, finally, one.